Saturday, December 9, 2017

Does Brain Training Really Work?


molecube front
You might have heard of something called "brain training" in this modern era of Internet terminology. For online purposes, it's usually found in multiplayer brain games that supposedly "train" the person's brain to be brighter, sharper, or smarter than it was before it engaged in the game. Does it work though? Surprisingly, there's a large body of information to suggest that brain training does indeed do SOMETHING positive to the brain's neurological pathways.

It's a concept that's similar to how we lift weights to train our muscles to handle a certain amount of pressure and strain. If we lift weights, our muscles grow and become more productive. Brain training is supposed to work the same way. By "working out" the brain with puzzles and other multiplayer games designed for brain power, your brain is supposed to become more active and therefore more available for use.

While the verdict isn't entirely out and we don't know exactly if brain training works on a long-term basis, it seems that at least in short-term studies, people experience a burst of activity when playing these games that indeed do make their brains more engaged in their surroundings and therefore more available to do work that requires brain power. Many companies and educational institutions encourage brain training in the same way that they encourage their employees and students to eat and exercise to become healthier.

Neuroscience teaches us that a human brain reaches peak performance between the ages of 16 and 25. After the latter age, the brain tends to stop performing at peak performance and begins to decline. In order to combat this, scientists have wondered if stimulating the brain into active mode. And so far, the results have been impressive. People who engage their brains actively in reading and brain games do tend to be more stimulated mentally than others who simply let the decline go ahead full speed ahead without trying to intervene.

Only time will tell exactly how these brain games affect people over the long run, but as long as people report good results with them, it's likely that universities and employers will continue to encourage their members to continue using brain games as a way to stimulate mental activity as they age. Age is only one factor, though. The moral of the story seems to be: Don't let your brain gets lazy!


About This Blog

Blog Archive

  © Free Blogger Templates Blogger Theme by 2008

Back to TOP